Building Organizational Capabilities for Managing Economic Crisis: The Role of Market Orientation and Strategic Flexibility

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Authors: R. Grewal, P. Tansuhaj

Publication Year: 2001

Source: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3203381

Journal: Journal of Marketing

Volume: 65

Issue: 2

Categories: Organizational Change, Crisis, Quantitative


Abstract

Firms around the world often must manage and survive economic crises. Recent cases in Asia, Eastern Europe, and South America bear testimony to this point. As economic weak spots are integrated into the global economy, it is timely to develop an understanding of organizational capabilities that can help firms manage their way through such crises. The authors investigate the role of market orientation and strategic flexibility in helping Thai firms manage the recent Asian crisis. The results demonstrate the contingent nature of the influence of market orientation and strategic flexibility on firm performance after a crisis has occurred. As hypothesized, market orientation has an adverse effect on firm performance after a crisis. This effect is moderated by demand and technological uncertainty and is enhanced by competitive intensity. In contrast, strategic flexibility has a positive influence on firm performance after a crisis, which is enhanced by competitive intensity and moderated by demand and technological uncertainty. It seems that market orientation and strategic flexibility complement each other in their efficacy to help firms manage varying environmental conditions.