Difference between revisions of "Competencies for managing change"

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{{Literature
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|Authors=L. Crawford, A.H. Nahmias,
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|PublicationYear=2010
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|Source=http://epublications.bond.edu.au/sustainable_development/57/
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|Type=Paper
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|Journal=International Journal of Project Management
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|Volume=28
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|Issue=4
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|Categories=Organizational Change, Change, Change Management, Qualitative
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}}
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{{Abstract
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|Abstract=Organizational changes are now recognised as a specific project type that can benefit from the application of project management skills, tools and techniques. Associated with this trend is evidence of a degree of rivalry in the marketplace between Project Managers and Change Managers concerning who should be managing business change. And these are not the only contenders. Corporate executives and senior managers, although they may engage the assistance of both Project Managers and Change Managers, generally see themselves as taking the leading roles in managing major organisational changes and transformations. As such endeavours are most likely to take the form of programs, comprising multiple projects across the organisation, Program Managers are seen by some as being most likely to be responsible for managing organisational change initiatives. This paper reports on research undertaken to explore the differences in approach and practice of Project, Program and Change Managers as a basis for determining the competencies required to effectively manage change initiatives.
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{{Critical Reflection}}
 
<h2>General Information</h2>'''Author:''' Crawford, L. &amp; Nahmias, A.H.<br />'''Title:''' Competencies for managing change<br />'''Year of Publication:''' 2010<br />'''Journal:''' International journal of project management<br />'''Volume:''' 28 <br />'''Issue:''' 4<br />'''Source:''' http://epublications.bond.edu.au/sustainable_development/57/<br />'''Keywords:''' [[:Category:Case study|case study]], , [[:Category:Management|management]], [[:Category:Qualitative|qualitative]]<br /><h2>Abstract</h2>Organizational changes are now recognised as a specific project type that can benefit from the application of project management skills, tools and techniques. Associated with this trend is evidence of a degree of rivalry in the marketplace between Project Managers and Change Managers concerning who should be managing business change. And these are not the only contenders. Corporate executives and senior managers, although they may engage the assistance of both Project Managers and Change Managers, generally see themselves as taking the leading roles in managing major organisational changes and transformations. As such endeavours are most likely to take the form of programs, comprising multiple projects across the organisation, Program Managers are seen by some as being most likely to be responsible for managing organisational change initiatives. This paper reports on research undertaken to explore the differences in approach and practice of Project, Program and Change Managers as a basis for determining the competencies required to effectively manage change initiatives. <br />
 
<h2>General Information</h2>'''Author:''' Crawford, L. &amp; Nahmias, A.H.<br />'''Title:''' Competencies for managing change<br />'''Year of Publication:''' 2010<br />'''Journal:''' International journal of project management<br />'''Volume:''' 28 <br />'''Issue:''' 4<br />'''Source:''' http://epublications.bond.edu.au/sustainable_development/57/<br />'''Keywords:''' [[:Category:Case study|case study]], , [[:Category:Management|management]], [[:Category:Qualitative|qualitative]]<br /><h2>Abstract</h2>Organizational changes are now recognised as a specific project type that can benefit from the application of project management skills, tools and techniques. Associated with this trend is evidence of a degree of rivalry in the marketplace between Project Managers and Change Managers concerning who should be managing business change. And these are not the only contenders. Corporate executives and senior managers, although they may engage the assistance of both Project Managers and Change Managers, generally see themselves as taking the leading roles in managing major organisational changes and transformations. As such endeavours are most likely to take the form of programs, comprising multiple projects across the organisation, Program Managers are seen by some as being most likely to be responsible for managing organisational change initiatives. This paper reports on research undertaken to explore the differences in approach and practice of Project, Program and Change Managers as a basis for determining the competencies required to effectively manage change initiatives. <br />
  
 
[[Category:Literature]]
 
[[Category:Literature]]

Revision as of 04:41, 8 March 2017

Authors: L. Crawford, A.H. Nahmias

Publication Year: 2010

Source: http://epublications.bond.edu.au/sustainable_development/57/

Journal: International Journal of Project Management

Volume: 28

Issue: 4

Categories: Organizational Change, Change, Change Management, Qualitative


Abstract

Organizational changes are now recognised as a specific project type that can benefit from the application of project management skills, tools and techniques. Associated with this trend is evidence of a degree of rivalry in the marketplace between Project Managers and Change Managers concerning who should be managing business change. And these are not the only contenders. Corporate executives and senior managers, although they may engage the assistance of both Project Managers and Change Managers, generally see themselves as taking the leading roles in managing major organisational changes and transformations. As such endeavours are most likely to take the form of programs, comprising multiple projects across the organisation, Program Managers are seen by some as being most likely to be responsible for managing organisational change initiatives. This paper reports on research undertaken to explore the differences in approach and practice of Project, Program and Change Managers as a basis for determining the competencies required to effectively manage change initiatives.



General Information

Author: Crawford, L. & Nahmias, A.H.
Title: Competencies for managing change
Year of Publication: 2010
Journal: International journal of project management
Volume: 28
Issue: 4
Source: http://epublications.bond.edu.au/sustainable_development/57/
Keywords: case study, , management, qualitative

Abstract

Organizational changes are now recognised as a specific project type that can benefit from the application of project management skills, tools and techniques. Associated with this trend is evidence of a degree of rivalry in the marketplace between Project Managers and Change Managers concerning who should be managing business change. And these are not the only contenders. Corporate executives and senior managers, although they may engage the assistance of both Project Managers and Change Managers, generally see themselves as taking the leading roles in managing major organisational changes and transformations. As such endeavours are most likely to take the form of programs, comprising multiple projects across the organisation, Program Managers are seen by some as being most likely to be responsible for managing organisational change initiatives. This paper reports on research undertaken to explore the differences in approach and practice of Project, Program and Change Managers as a basis for determining the competencies required to effectively manage change initiatives.