Difference between revisions of "From Resilience to Transformation: the Adaptive Cycle in Two Mexican Urban Centers"

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[[category:literature]]
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'''Author:''' Pelling, M. & Manuel-Navarrete, D.
= Author(s) - Mark Pelling and David Manuel-Navarrete=
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=== Title - From Resilience to Transformation: the Adaptive Cycle in Two Mexican Urban Centers ===
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=== Source - http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/dlc/bitstream/handle/10535/7591/ES-2011-4038.pdf?sequence=1 ===
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=== Year of Publication - 2011===
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=== Abstract ===
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This article focuses on the resilience to the climate change. Resilience is literally refered to a material's ability tho be both elastic and shock resistant. In this case, resilience means to be flexible to any climate change. This theoretical frame is applied to Mahahual and Playa del Carmen, two rapidly expanding towns on Mexico’s Caribbean coast. The aim of the article is to explore the potential for resilience theory to meet this challenge by applying a framework that integrates the adaptive cycle theory to place power at the heart of the analysis and question the transformational qualities of social systems facing climate change.
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'''Title:''' From resilience to transformation: the adaptive cycle in two Mexican urban centers
A very interesting article that also helped whith my presentation as I was interested to look for further information about disaster management and crisis.
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'''Year of Publication:''' 2011
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'''Journal:''' Ecology and Society
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'''Volume:''' 16 '''Issue:''' 2
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'''Source:''' http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol16/iss2/art11/
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'''Keywords:''' [[:Category:Case study|case study]], [[:Category:Change|change]], [[:Category:Ecology|ecology]], [[:Category:Gestalt Switch|gestalt switch]], [[:Category:Management|management]], [[:Category:Organization|organization]], [[:Category:Qualitative|qualitative]], [[:Category:Remember|remember]], [[:Category:Revolt|revolt]]
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'''Abstract:''' Climate change is but one expression of the internal contradictions of capitalism that include also economic inequality and political alienation. Seen in this way analysis of human responses to climate change must engage with social relations of power. We explore the potential for resilience theory to meet this challenge by applying a framework that integrates the adaptive cycle heuristic and structuration theory to place power at the heart of the analysis and question the transformational qualities of social systems facing climate change. This theoretical frame is applied to Mahahual and Playa del Carmen, two rapidly expanding towns on Mexico’s Caribbean coast. The resilience lens is successful in highlighting internal contradictions that maintain social relations of rigidity above flexibility in the existing governance regimes and development pathway. This generates a set of reinforcing institutions and actions that support the status quo while simultaneously undermining long-term flexibility, equitable and sustainable development. One outcome is the placing of limits on scope for adaptation and mitigation to climate change which are externalized from everyday life and development planning alike.
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[[Category:Literature]]
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[[Category:Case study]]
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[[Category:Change]]
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[[Category:Ecology]]
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[[Category:Gestalt Switch]]
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[[Category:Management]]
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[[Category:Organization]]
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[[Category:Qualitative]]
 +
[[Category:Remember]]
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[[Category:Revolt]]

Revision as of 05:18, 11 May 2013

Author: Pelling, M. & Manuel-Navarrete, D.

Title: From resilience to transformation: the adaptive cycle in two Mexican urban centers

Year of Publication: 2011

Journal: Ecology and Society

Volume: 16 Issue: 2

Source: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol16/iss2/art11/

Keywords: case study, change, ecology, gestalt switch, management, organization, qualitative, remember, revolt

Abstract: Climate change is but one expression of the internal contradictions of capitalism that include also economic inequality and political alienation. Seen in this way analysis of human responses to climate change must engage with social relations of power. We explore the potential for resilience theory to meet this challenge by applying a framework that integrates the adaptive cycle heuristic and structuration theory to place power at the heart of the analysis and question the transformational qualities of social systems facing climate change. This theoretical frame is applied to Mahahual and Playa del Carmen, two rapidly expanding towns on Mexico’s Caribbean coast. The resilience lens is successful in highlighting internal contradictions that maintain social relations of rigidity above flexibility in the existing governance regimes and development pathway. This generates a set of reinforcing institutions and actions that support the status quo while simultaneously undermining long-term flexibility, equitable and sustainable development. One outcome is the placing of limits on scope for adaptation and mitigation to climate change which are externalized from everyday life and development planning alike.