Difference between revisions of "Resilience Thinking: Integrating Resilience, Adaptability and Transformability"

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'''Title:''' Resilience Thinking: Integrating Resilience, Adaptability and Transformability<br />
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'''Author:''' Folke, C., Carpenter, S.R., Walker, B., Scheffer, M., Chapin, T,. Rockström, J.
'''Authors: ''' Folke, C., Carpenter, S. R., Walker, B., Scheffer, M., Chapin, T., & Rockström, J.<br />
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'''Year:''' 2010<br />
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'''Source:''' Ecology and Society<br />
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[[Category:Literature]]
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'''Title:''' Resilience thinking: integrating resilience, adaptability and transformability
  
== Abstract ==
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'''Year of Publication:''' 2010
The concept of resilience was first introduced by Holling (1973). The authors of this article coined the term "resilience thinking" as a means to address the dynamics and development of complex social-ecological systems (SES), in which three aspects are fundamental: resilience, adaptability, and transformability. The authors argue that the dynamics between periods of abrupt and gradual change and the ability to adapt and transform for persistence constitute the essence of the resilience of SES. The central idea of resilience and the need to better understand what drives SES leads the authors to develop a theoretical framework of resilience thinking. To this end the authors rephrased the three aforementioned core elements or resilience thinking; resilience, adaptability, and transformability in such a way that it better represents their ideas. [http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss4/art20/table1.html Table 1] (Folke, et al., 2010, p. 3) provides an overview of the framework of resilience thinking, including its key terms. In conclusion the authors assert that transformational change at smaller scales enables resilience at larger scales, while the capacity to transform at smaller scales draws on resilience at other scales. Thus, it may be inferred that deliberate transformation involves novelty and innovation, where resilience of the old is broken down and resilience of the new is being built.
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Folke, C., Carpenter, S. R., Walker, B., Scheffer, M., Chapin, T., & Rockström, J. (2010). Resilience thinking: integrating resilience, adaptability and transformability. Ecology and Society, 15(4), 20.
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'''Journal:''' Ecology and Society
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'''Volume:''' 15 '''Issue:''' 4
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'''Source:''' http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss4/art20/
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'''Keywords:''' [[:Category:Change|change]], [[:Category:Crisis|crisis]], [[:Category:Ecology|ecology]], [[:Category:Entrepreneurship|entrepreneurship]], [[:Category:Equilibrium|equilibrium]], [[:Category:Gestalt Switch|gestalt switch]], [[:Category:New Combination|new combination]], [[:Category:Qualitative|qualitative]]
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'''Abstract:''' Resilience thinking addresses the dynamics and development of complex social–ecological systems (SES). Three aspects are central: resilience, adaptability and transformability. These aspects interrelate across multiple scales. Resilience in this context is the capacity of a SES to continually change and adapt yet remain within critical thresholds. Adaptability is part of resilience. It represents the capacity to adjust responses to changing external drivers and internal processes and thereby allow for development along the current trajectory (stability domain). Transformability is the capacity to cross thresholds into new development trajectories. Transformational change at smaller scales enables resilience at larger scales. The capacity to transform at smaller scales draws on resilience from multiple scales, making use of crises as windows of opportunity for novelty and innovation, and recombining sources of experience and knowledge to navigate social–ecological transitions. Society must seriously consider ways to foster resilience of smaller more manageable SESs that contribute to Earth System resilience and to explore options for deliberate transformation of SESs that threaten Earth System resilience.
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[[Category:Literature]]
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[[Category:Change]]
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[[Category:Crisis]]
 +
[[Category:Ecology]]
 +
[[Category:Entrepreneurship]]
 +
[[Category:Equilibrium]]
 +
[[Category:Gestalt Switch]]
 +
[[Category:New Combination]]
 +
[[Category:Qualitative]]

Revision as of 02:52, 11 May 2013

Author: Folke, C., Carpenter, S.R., Walker, B., Scheffer, M., Chapin, T,. Rockström, J.

Title: Resilience thinking: integrating resilience, adaptability and transformability

Year of Publication: 2010

Journal: Ecology and Society

Volume: 15 Issue: 4

Source: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss4/art20/

Keywords: change, crisis, ecology, entrepreneurship, equilibrium, gestalt switch, new combination, qualitative

Abstract: Resilience thinking addresses the dynamics and development of complex social–ecological systems (SES). Three aspects are central: resilience, adaptability and transformability. These aspects interrelate across multiple scales. Resilience in this context is the capacity of a SES to continually change and adapt yet remain within critical thresholds. Adaptability is part of resilience. It represents the capacity to adjust responses to changing external drivers and internal processes and thereby allow for development along the current trajectory (stability domain). Transformability is the capacity to cross thresholds into new development trajectories. Transformational change at smaller scales enables resilience at larger scales. The capacity to transform at smaller scales draws on resilience from multiple scales, making use of crises as windows of opportunity for novelty and innovation, and recombining sources of experience and knowledge to navigate social–ecological transitions. Society must seriously consider ways to foster resilience of smaller more manageable SESs that contribute to Earth System resilience and to explore options for deliberate transformation of SESs that threaten Earth System resilience.