Difference between revisions of "Structural Inertia and Organizational Change"

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'''Volume:''' 49 '''Issue:''' 2
 
'''Volume:''' 49 '''Issue:''' 2
  
'''Keywords: [[:Category:Change|change]], [[:Category:Ecology|ecology]], [[:Category:New Combination|new combination]], [[:Category:Remember|remember]],  [[:Category:Theory Oriented|theory oriented]]
+
'''Keywords: [[:Category:Change|change]], [[:Category:Ecology|ecology]], [[:Category:New Combination|new combination]], [[:Category:Organization|organization]], [[:Category:Remember|remember]],  [[:Category:Theory Oriented|theory oriented]]
  
 
'''Abstract:''' Theory and research on organization-environment relations from a population ecology perspective have been based on the assumption that inertial pressures on structure are strong. Thispaper attempts to clarify the meaning of structural inertia and to derive propositions about structural inertia from an explicit evolutionary model. Theproposed theory treats high levels of structural inertia as a consequence of a selection process rather than as a precondition for selection. It also considers how the strength of inertial forces varies with age, size, and complexity.
 
'''Abstract:''' Theory and research on organization-environment relations from a population ecology perspective have been based on the assumption that inertial pressures on structure are strong. Thispaper attempts to clarify the meaning of structural inertia and to derive propositions about structural inertia from an explicit evolutionary model. Theproposed theory treats high levels of structural inertia as a consequence of a selection process rather than as a precondition for selection. It also considers how the strength of inertial forces varies with age, size, and complexity.

Revision as of 03:19, 14 May 2013

Author: Hannan, Michael T. & Freeman John

Title: Inertia and Organizational Change

Source: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095567

Year of Publication: April 1984

Journal: American Sociological Review

Volume: 49 Issue: 2

Keywords: change, ecology, new combination, organization, remember, theory oriented

Abstract: Theory and research on organization-environment relations from a population ecology perspective have been based on the assumption that inertial pressures on structure are strong. Thispaper attempts to clarify the meaning of structural inertia and to derive propositions about structural inertia from an explicit evolutionary model. Theproposed theory treats high levels of structural inertia as a consequence of a selection process rather than as a precondition for selection. It also considers how the strength of inertial forces varies with age, size, and complexity.