Studying organizational change and development: challenges for future research

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Contributors

Ferdi, Iris, Koen, Tobias Lensker

Authors: A.M. Pettigrew, R.W. Woodman, K.S. Cameron

Publication Year: 2001

Source: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069411

Journal: Academy of Management Journal

Volume: 44

Issue: 4

Categories: Organizational Change, Change, Qualitative


Abstract

This article presents several studies that examine organizational change. The authors note that certain issues should be addressed when examining the studies including an examination of the multiple contexts and levels of analysis in studying organizational change, the inclusion of time, history, process and action, the link between change processes and organizational performance, the investigation of international and cross-cultural comparisons, the study of receptivity, customization, sequenicng, pace and episodic versus continusous change and the partnership between scholars and practicioners in studying change. The author discuss how these issues are related to the concepts in the studies and note they research has not addressed these issues at this point in time.


Critical Reflection

This article considers that the field of organizational change is far from being mature in understanding the dynamics and effects of time, process, discontinuity and context. Also this article considers relevant to explain 6 interconnected analytical issues since it considers them underdeveloped: -Examination of multiple contexts and levels of analysis in studying organizational change -The inclusion of time, history, process and action -The link between change process and organization performance outcomes -The investigation of international and cross-cultural comparisons in research on organizational change -The study of receptivity, customization, sequencing, pace and episodic versus continuous change processes -The partnership between scholars and practitioners in studying organizational change. In this article is also empathize that the purpose of the article is not to give a comprehensive review of what is known and not known about organizational change instead they acknowledge that their analytical challenges are only partly and only hope to make them provocative enough for those who have interest in the study of organizational change. To conclude this article the authors state that there is the need to question the current organizational sciences and also to transcend current beliefs of scholars and users while, at the same time, to engage with these believes to enhance disciplinary knowledge on change rather than to overwhelm it.

Contributors

Ferdi, Iris, Koen, Tobias Lensker