The World Until Yesterday

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Contributors

Ferdi, Iris, Koen, Olivier, Rutger Bouwes

Authors: J. Diamond

Publication Year: 2012

Source: http://www.adaptivecycle.nl/images/Pattynama_10430423_The_world_until_Yesterday.pdf


Categories: Digital Transformation, Change


Abstract

The author, Jared Diamond, starts the book with a prologue about an airport scene. He starts by sketching an airport, how the airport looks (lines, x-ray machines etc.), what items are there to see (Wall clocks, baggage belts etc.) and what type of people there are (pilot, stewards, cops, tourists etc.. The main idea behind this is: we take it all for granted. Distinctions with other airports are that most people are from New Guinea, and the national flag is different. He then start discussing the fact that New Guinea changed a lot, since it was founded by the Australians in 1931. Where other countries had thousands of years before changing in the current culture, in New Guinea it only took 75 years. In 1931 everyone would still attack one another that is unfamiliar, while in the current society that is no longer even a thought. The western culture affected the society in New Guinea a lot. The study of the traditional society is because it is interesting to see how traditional lifestyles has shaped us to what we are. And how we take for granted that our basic needs are provided and can be bought in local supermarkets. The book is written to provide a research on how different traditional societies are, and how they affect us. “We shall see that some of those solutions provided by the traditional society may strike us, as superior to normal practices in the first world. ” Although some thing are very positive in the traditional societies, other considers ourselves blessed to have discarded (such as infanticide, abandoning or killing elderly people). “Traditional societies may not only suggest to us some better living practices, but may also help us appreciate some advantages of our own society that we take for granted.”

Contributors

Ferdi, Iris, Koen, Olivier, Rutger Bouwes