Curiosity Quotes

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Contributors

Jolanta Wos

  • “Socrates told us, ‘the unexamined life is not worth living.’ I think he’s calling for curiosity, more than knowledge. In every human society at all times and at all levels, the curious are at the leading edge.” Roger Ebert, (journalist)
  • Curiosity is over-valued in our society, and one of the top causes of distraction in our increasingly information-saturated world.” Jeremy Bennett, (Spiritual Advisor, Intuitive Strategist).
  • “Free curiosity has greater power to stimulate learning than rigorous coercion. Nevertheless, the free ranging flux of curiosity is channeled by discipline under Your (God’s) Law.” St. Augustine (354–430), Confessions, (Latin philosopher and theologian).
  • “When you log onto the Internet, do you stay focused on your search exclusively, or do you occasionally follow strings of curiosity? We often go where our curiosity takes us, which is human nature and usually fun. Problems arise as a leader, however, when your curiosity takes someone else for a ride.” Gary Cohen, (Business, Executive, Leadership Coach).
  • “Human spirit is the ability to face the uncertainty of the future with curiosity and optimism. It is the belief that problems can be solved, differences resolved. It is a type of confidence. And it is fragile. It can be blackened by fear, and superstition. By the year 2050, when the conflict began, the world had fallen upon fearful, superstitious times.” Bernard Beckett, Genesis, (young adults fiction writer).
  • Curiosity, like all other desires, produces pain as well as pleasure.” Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), Rambler (Catholic periodical) No.161, October 1, 1751 (poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer).
  • “I am far from any intention to limit curiosity, or confine the labours of learning to arts of immediate and necessary use. It is only from the various essays of experimental industry, and the vague excursions of mind set upon discovery, that any advancement of knowledge can be expected; and though many must be disappointed in their labours, yet they are not to be charged with having spent their time in vain; their example contributed to inspire emulation, and their miscarriage taught others the way to success.” Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), Rambler (Catholic periodical) No.180, December 7, 1751 (poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer).


Further information regarding the role of Curiosity in the Adaptive Cycle can be obtained in Group 2 Student Lecture.

Contributors

Jolanta Wos