Spiral of Curiosity

From Adaptive Cycle
Jump to: navigation, search

Contributors

Jolanta Wos

Curiosity essentially appears to be one of the intrinsic features of every human being. What may differ, however, it its degree of magnitude. Curiosity expresses itself in the appetite for obtaining novel experience through the use of one's senses and in this manner stimulates exploratory behaviour. In humans, this sensation is one of the fundamental traits behind motivation. [1]

When one experiences an increasing gap in the level of knowledge, her or his curiosity should normally be triggered (Step 1), this way motivating an individual to explore the partially or completely unknown field (Step 2). At the onset of this learning process, one is guided by her or his tacit/experimental knowledge in search of further information or experience that would satisfy the perceived knowledge gap. During this procedure, one modifies the implicit awareness into more explicit/codified information. The comprehension attained this way, however, may not totally bridge the initial knowledge gap, intensify the orignial one or even create an utterly new one (Step 3). This accentuated gap leads to an increased level of curiosity (Step 4), reinforcing one's need to acquire additional knowledge.
What the spiral of curiosity basically exemplifies is the fact that the increased intensity of curiosity compells an individual to acquire more and more information and at the same time to experience an increasing number of knowledge gaps. This in turns stimulates curiosity further, this way enhancing the attempts of the relevant knowledge acquisition and eventually creating more knowledge gaps that need to be bridged. [1]

This process may continue indefinitely, be temporarily adjourned or permanently terminated once a person experiences a satisfactory level of knowledge or is attracted by another source of interest.

Figure 1: Spiral of Curiosity as adopted from Harvey


For further information regarding the role of Curiosity in the Adaptive Cycle go back to Group 2 Student Lecture.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Harvey, Michael., Novicevic, Milorad., Leonard, Nancy., Payne, Dinah., The Role of Curiosity in Global Managers' Decision-Making. Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, 2007, Vol.13, No.3, p.44

Contributors

Jolanta Wos